Category: Online Photography Courses

is the iphone worth it??????????

Question by Jaycee K: is the iphone worth it??????????
ok so i already have at&t and my contract is up at the end of this month. my mom said that i could get an iphone if i wanted to but was wondering if it is a good phone and if it is really worth it. i already have an ipod touch (1st generation 32gb) but if i do get the iphone i would be giving that to my sister who doesnt have and ipod.

give me pros and cons on both the 3g and the 3gs and if one is more worth it that the other.

im 15 and if i dont get the iphone im going to get the xenon… so just give me you opinion….

thanks!!

Best answer:

Answer by LOL Is A Funny Word
Opinion= im 14 1/2 and im getting a 3GS This September!, i would recommend the 3GS because it has alot of apps (you will NEVER Get bored of), and it has a phone and an IPOD In it! what would you need more than that! like for me, i use a phone and an ipod and a NDS (this is because it has games like the iphone has apps) But now i can make them 3 all in to one little device. the 3GS has Video while the 3G doesnt, the 3GS is alot faster, and the 3GS Has Campos (if youre lost in the desert lol)!

Pros (All Models):

* Thin, sleek design.
* Bright, high-resolution display designed for video playback.
* Slick “multi-touch” interface, “self switching” accelerometer, “proximity sensors”, and ambient light sensor.
* Large storage capacity for a mobile phone (8 or 16 GB for iPhone 3G, 16 GB or 32 GB for iPhone 3GS).
* Built-in support for 3G, wi-fi, and Bluetooth 2.0+EDR (2.1+EDR for iPhone 3GS).
* GPS support.
* High-quality pre-installed applications, including a “desktop class” web browser, HTML capable e-mail client, and integrated Google Maps, as well as the potential for thousands of third-party applications via the AppStore.
* Support to read, but not edit, Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint as well as Adobe PDF files.
* Built-in camera for basic photography (2 megapixels for iPhone 3G, 3 megapixels and video support for iPhone 3GS).
* Inexpensive (but tied to a contract in many countries).

Additional Pros (iPhone 3GS over iPhone 3G):

* Significantly faster than the iPhone 3G (particularly graphics performance — Open GL ES 2.0 — which can make a big difference for gaming).
* Improved camera (except for low light performance), with autofocus, macro, and white balance support, and a “tap to focus” feature.
* Video recording support (VGA at 30 FPS, basic “video editing” — cut the beginning and end of a clip “in camera”).
* Support for faster 3G support (7.2 Mbps HSDPA).
* Twice the storage (16 GB or 32 GB rather than 8 GB or 16 GB).
* Modestly better battery life.
* “Oleophobic” oil repellent display.
* Digital compass (particularly useful for orientation on Google Maps).
* VoiceOver & voice control.
* Integrated Nike + iPod support.

Cons (All Models):

* Tied to expensive multi-year contracts in many countries.
* No support to edit Microsoft Word, Excel, or PowerPoint files (online editing forthcoming).
* No support for Flash.
* Lack of tactile feedback may bother some users.
* Battery life may be insufficient for heavy users.
* Some competitive mobile phones offer superior cameras and additional features.
* Substantially larger capacity iPod models are available for less money per GB.

Ultimately, if you need a smartphone, and you are not bothered by the often expensive contract, then the iPhone 3G or iPhone 3GS may be a good choice for you.

In the US, the iPhone 3G with 8 GB of internal storage is available for US$ 99 with a two-year contract for new AT&T Wireless customers only and the iPhone 3GS is available with 16 GB or 32 GB of internal storage for US$ 199 or US$ 299, respectively. Non-qualified/existing customers have to pay US$ 499 for the iPhone 3G and US$ 599 or US$ 699 for the iPhone 3GS.

Hope this helps =D

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Q&A: how do you become an animator?

Question by Veronica: how do you become an animator?
1. what courses do you need?

how high should my marks be?

3.i want to be a computer animator, do you still need good drawng skills?

4.what are good animation schools to get in? i live in canada near toronto, but ouside of canada is fine too

5 after you get your college/university diploma then what do you do? how do you start?

6 i want to work withdisney/pixar how do i get started? how do i make that happen? dream works animation is fine to 😀

7.how much pay do i get?

8.once im in a buisness how long does it usually take untill i do my own animation?

9. do i get some free time?

10.doi have to make up stories or can other people do that?

11s there any tips or anything i should know about?

12any advise?

Best answer:

Answer by NOOB
What are the courses you can take to help you make it?

Are there certain skills you must possess if you want to become an animator?

Where do you go from there?

Animation isn’t for everyone!

First of all, animation isn’t for everyone. You have to love the art form.

More important, those who are artistic, creative and innovative stand a better chance of shining in the field.

After all, it isn’t just about making mice run across a screen. Today, an animator in India can find himself or herself doing anything from cartoon films and video games to promos for television serials.

Ask Vanitha Rangaraju-Ramanan. This woman went from Trichy in Tamil Nadu to the team that won an Oscar for 2002’s animated film Shrek.

Vanitha works as a Lighting Technical Director, and was part of the team responsible for bringing the components of a shot together in Shrek.

So, is there a market?

You bet. All we had a few months ago was Cartoon Network. Now, almost all channels devote at least a couple of hours to animated content alone.

Consider this as well: Going by the amount of outsourcing currently coming our way, India needs over 20,000 animators. We have less than 4,000!

2D ink and paint, or 3D models?

Absolute newbies in animation will find themselves facing options like 3D and 2D. Then there is computer-generated animation, animation for films, animation for television and multimedia animation.

2D relies on an animator’s artistic abilities with ink and paint. It is the kind of work thought of and delivered on paper or cells (like the frames you see in a cartoon strip). Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, for instance.

3D is a whole other ball of wax. This is a creation delivered with the help of models and sets. Remember the film Chicken Run? Or Toy Story? It also depends on an animator’s artistic abilities in modelling.

While 2D involves the placing of each cell before an animation camera and then filming it, 3D animation calls for models to be placed on a set, with body postures manipulated shot by shot. The result is a sequence of movements that is realistic.

Before you join an institute

While joining an institute that offers courses in animation would be an obvious beginning, here are some things you should consider:

1. Do your homework. Do not, for even a minute, assume all courses offered are of the same calibre.

2. You might want to contact these institutes, sit down with faculty and understand their individual strengths before signing off an amount of money to them.

3. Ask questions. Meet people in the industry.

4. Consider the going employment rate after the completion of a particular programme.

5. See if the institute has tie-ups with professionals outside.

6. Check if practical experience is being offered.

7. Find out if they can help you find a job once you have finished the course.

“When I decided to dabble in animation, I did ask a number of institutes about the kind of courses they were offering,” says Jasbir Bolar, who relies on animation to support his ventures into advertising online.

“I was surprised by the number of institutes in Mumbai alone, which made picking a course difficult. I opted for software like ‘Director’ and ‘Premier’ for my work on 2D animation, moving on to ‘3D Max’ for everything on 3D. Eventually, I picked a course by matching the content offered with my personal requirements. That, I think, is the best way to do it.”

What skills do you need to become an animator?

Artistic ability is obviously the most important.

There are other skills that always help though, such as self-motivation, a tremendous amount of patience — ever tried moving a character centimetre by centimetre to build a sequence that lasts for a minute? — as well as an ability to communicate easily and work as a team.

Also, mastering the basics of script writing, stop-motion photography and editing would be a definite plus.

Remember, animators often work completely in isolation. They do everything from writing a script and creating a storyboard, to directing, producing and editing their work.

The right age?

There is simply no right age to begin.

You could start now, if you liked, with something simple like a flick book — pieces of paper with characters moving page by page, creating the illusion of movement when the pages are flipped.

You could also think of possible storylines or try your hand at creating characters with clay modelling.

One more thing

The skills you develop as an animator don’t belong to cartoon films alone.

They can be used in a whole lot of other ways. When it comes to making an animated film, an animator is just a cog in the wheel.

There are assistant animators, background and layout artists, visual development artists, animators working on effects alone, storyboard artists, graphic designers — the list can be pretty exhausting.

While the courses you have access to have a lot to do with where you live, checking what’s online can help in some way.

1. There are eight-month courses at institutes like Escotoonz in New Delhi. Their animation services include everything from pre-production and layout posing, to backgrounds, key animation, digital compositing, post-production, flash and 3D animation. You can join the minute you clear your higher secondary examination.

2. Companies like Mumbai-based Crest Communications, and institutes like Arena Multimedia or Pentamedia, also offer courses that are useful.

3. Residents of Delhi also have the option of studying for papers on animation offered by:

Chandigarh College Of Arts
Sector 10C
Chandigarh 160 010

OR

College of Art
Tilak Marg
New Delhi 110 001

The next step

1. You might want to consider creating a showreel of animated sequences you have worked on, because that is what potential employers may ask for.

2. You could also create a portfolio of character designs and storyboards.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

David Tipling’s 4 week On-Line Bird photography course includes 4 weekly video Tutorials with Assignments Weekly 3000-4000 word transcripts 4 marked assignments from your tutor 1-2-1 feed back and comments Bird Photography Course: You will Learn How To Take Sharp Well-Focused Shots of Birds that any ornithologist would be proud of Firstly, be aware of the basics of bird photography so that you know what you’re aiming at whenever you’re out photographing birds. Then learn how to take sharp well-focused shots through our online photography workshops
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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Blackberry Bold or iPhone 3GS?!?

Question by J: Blackberry Bold or iPhone 3GS?!?
I currently have a first generation iPhone. My 2 year contract with AT&T ended in June. Now I want something new. I like my iPhone, but I’m kind of bored with it. I mean I’ve had it for 2 years! Blackberry Bold looks really nice but I’ve never used a Blackberry. I can’t make up my mind!

Best answer:

Answer by LOL Is A Funny Word
Depends on how old you are, for example, blackberry bold is a business phone, so you cant get that much songs or apps on it!

But the GS Now is alot different in a good way it has video, alot faster, 3MP Camera, Its like the Bold but doesnt have a QWERTY And its touch and No BB Messenger !

Here are the pros and cons of 3GS AND 3G!
Pros (All Models):

* Thin, sleek design.
* Bright, high-resolution display designed for video playback.
* Slick “multi-touch” interface, “self switching” accelerometer, “proximity sensors”, and ambient light sensor.
* Large storage capacity for a mobile phone (8 or 16 GB for iPhone 3G, 16 GB or 32 GB for iPhone 3GS).
* Built-in support for 3G, wi-fi, and Bluetooth 2.0+EDR (2.1+EDR for iPhone 3GS).
* GPS support.
* High-quality pre-installed applications, including a “desktop class” web browser, HTML capable e-mail client, and integrated Google Maps, as well as the potential for thousands of third-party applications via the AppStore.
* Support to read, but not edit, Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint as well as Adobe PDF files.
* Built-in camera for basic photography (2 megapixels for iPhone 3G, 3 megapixels and video support for iPhone 3GS).
* Inexpensive (but tied to a contract in many countries).

Additional Pros (iPhone 3GS over iPhone 3G):

* Significantly faster than the iPhone 3G (particularly graphics performance — Open GL ES 2.0 — which can make a big difference for gaming).
* Improved camera (except for low light performance), with autofocus, macro, and white balance support, and a “tap to focus” feature.
* Video recording support (VGA at 30 FPS, basic “video editing” — cut the beginning and end of a clip “in camera”).
* Support for faster 3G support (7.2 Mbps HSDPA).
* Twice the storage (16 GB or 32 GB rather than 8 GB or 16 GB).
* Modestly better battery life.
* “Oleophobic” oil repellent display.
* Digital compass (particularly useful for orientation on Google Maps).
* VoiceOver & voice control.
* Integrated Nike + iPod support.

Cons (All Models):

* Tied to expensive multi-year contracts in many countries.
* No support to edit Microsoft Word, Excel, or PowerPoint files (online editing forthcoming).
* No support for Flash.
* Lack of tactile feedback may bother some users.
* Battery life may be insufficient for heavy users.
* Some competitive mobile phones offer superior cameras and additional features.
* Substantially larger capacity iPod models are available for less money per GB.

Ultimately, if you need a smartphone, and you are not bothered by the often expensive contract, then the iPhone 3G or iPhone 3GS may be a good choice for you.

In the US, the iPhone 3G with 8 GB of internal storage is available for US$ 99 with a two-year contract for new AT&T Wireless customers only and the iPhone 3GS is available with 16 GB or 32 GB of internal storage for US$ 199 or US$ 299, respectively. Non-qualified/existing customers have to pay US$ 499 for the iPhone 3G and US$ 599 or US$ 699 for the iPhone 3GS.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Photography Classes on October 22

Announcement: Photography Classes on Saturday October 22 at 11:30 am at Pitman Photo – created at goanimate.com

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Where can I take a digital painting class in the Chicago area?

Question by anna: Where can I take a digital painting class in the Chicago area?
I’m only 15, so any place that you have to be above the age of like 18 won’t work. And by class, i don’t mean like a year-long course, or college. I mean ONE class, that I can just have some fun on a weekend at. I’m thinking of asking for this as my christmas present. 🙂 my dad takes photography classes downtown every once in awhile, and i got the idea to look into classes for myself- my area of passion being digital painting.

oh and lastly, i do not want an “introduction to photoshop” class or anything like that. i don’t care if i’m the only one under 18 in the class, but i do not want to learn the basics of photoshop- i already know those. i want an in-depth instruction about different painting techniques and styles in photoshop. on that note, i am by NO means an expert. so i also don’t want to be stuck in a class with professionals who are 10x more amazing than myself..!!

Best answer:

Answer by Pika Chu
This’ll sound funny, but for the current present day of our world, the best “class” you might find would be online. They’re not classes, they’re just tutorials made by really great digital painters on how they painted their works.

I’ve learned how to paint from http://YumeDust.DeviantArt.com. Unfortunately, she took it down, but her recent journal entry states she’s interested in making a YouTube video and painting in it.

Another place to look is on LiveStream, since many digital artists tend to paint in real time under a camera there. You can also converse with them if you have any questions via the chat box.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

www.BestGuideForAll.com — Photography Tips We have the best resources for photography tips. Check it out for yourself. Best place to learn photography.
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